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 US Department of Homeland Security - Federal Emergency Management Agency          FEMA NEWS

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FEMA approves $5.9 million in Hurricane Michael Public Assistance grants
FEMA approves $5.9 million in Hurricane Michael Public Assistance grants

PENSACOLA, Fla -- FEMA has approved grants totaling $5,926,692 to reimburse recovery expenses in Florida for Hurricane Michael in 2018.

Funding from FEMA’s Public Assistance program will provide the following reimbursements:

  • Florida Department of Corrections: $2,228,169 for evacuating and relocating inmates to temporary facilities and work release centers from Oct. 7, 2018 to Oct. 11, 2019.
  • Florida Department of Management Services: $1,585,045 for the costs of relocating Jackson County Sheriff's office and 911 essential emergency services, as well as making repairs and upgrades to the facility to make it operational.
  • First United Methodist Church in Panama City: $2,113,478 for replacing and repairing the church’s sanctuary, learning center, great hall and offices.

FEMA’s Public Assistance program is an essential source of funding for communities recovering from a federally declared disaster or emergency. The Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) works with FEMA during all phases of the program and reviews projects prior to FEMA final approval.

Applicants work directly with FEMA to develop projects and scopes of work. FEMA obligates funding for projects to FDEM after final approval.

Once a project is obligated, FDEM works closely with applicants to finalize grants and begin making payments. FDEM has procedures in place designed to ensure grant funding is provided to local communities as quickly as possible.

FEMA’s Public Assistance program provides grants to state, tribal and local governments, and certain private nonprofit organizations, including houses of worship, so communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies.

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FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

barbara.murien… Wed, 06/16/2021 - 15:44

Wed, 16 Jun 2021 15:44:14 +0000


FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Robertson Draw Fire
FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Robertson Draw Fire

DENVER – Early Wednesday morning, FEMA authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Robertson Draw Fire burning in Carbon County, Montana near Red Lodge and Belfry.

FEMA Acting Regional Administrator Nancy Dragani approved the state’s request for a federal Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) after receiving the request early this morning and determining that the fire threatened such destruction that it would constitute a major disaster.

At the time of the request, the Robertson Draw Fire was threatening 450 homes, which were under an evacuation order, as well as 312 buildings, infrastructure, utilities, and equipment in the area. The fire started on June 13 and has burned more than 10,000 acres.

The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating and controlling designated fires. It is a reimbursable program. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.

Fire Management Assistance Grants are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies.

When there is an FMAG authorization, additional funding is made available through the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction.

For more information on FMAGs, visit  https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grants-program-details. For HMGP Post Fire, visit https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire.

minh.phan Wed, 06/16/2021 - 14:52

Wed, 16 Jun 2021 14:52:32 +0000


Vermont Receives $1.9 Million Federal Grant for Emergency Feeding During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Vermont Receives $1.9 Million Federal Grant for Emergency Feeding During the Coronavirus Pandemic

REGION 1 – FEMA reimbursed the Vermont Agency of Human Services (AHS) $1,901,466 recently for the state’s Emergency Feeding Program during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2021.

FEMA provided funds through a grant awarded by its Public Assistance (PA) Grant Program. The grant covered 100% of the Emergency Feeding Program’s eligible costs submitted by AHS from Jan. 1 through April 27 for work by the Vermont Foodbank (www.vtfoodbank.org), the largest hunger-relief organization in the state. FEMA’s PA Program reimburses eligible applicants for actions taken in the immediate response to and during recovery from a major disaster.

AHS contracted with Barre-based, Vermont Foodbank for emergency feeding services to Vermonters in need related to Farmers to Families Food Box Programs from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the State of Vermont. The costs incurred in this project were above and beyond what USDA would cover. The foodbank distributed food boxes to local distribution centers.

“We are pleased to provide funds to reimburse the State of Vermont for the tremendous efforts it took to help feed Vermonters during the coronavirus pandemic this year,” said Acting Region 1 Administrator and Federal Coordinating Officer Paul Ford, who oversees FEMA’s operations throughout New England. “We have reimbursed our valued state partner more than $5.8 million for its Emergency Feeding Program this year.”

This is the third PA Program grant in 2021 for Vermont’s Emergency Feeding Program. On May 18, FEMA announced a $1,947,350 grant to the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development (ACCD). That grant covered the innovative Vermont Everyone Eats (VEE) Program, which provided nutritious meals to high-risk populations impacted by COVID-19 throughout Vermont from March 15 through April 11. Previously, the agency announced a $1,972,612 grant to ACCD which covered the VEE Program for high-risk populations impacted by coronavirus statewide from Jan. 18 through March 14.

As of June 16, FEMA’s PA Program obligated more than $232 million in 115 projects related to the COVID-19 pandemic in Vermont.

Eligible applicants for the PA Program include states, commonwealths, localities, certain types of private non-profit organizations, federally recognized Tribes and territories. Additional information about the program is at https://www.fema.gov/public-assistance-local-state-tribal-and-non-profit.

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FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters

adrien.urbani Wed, 06/16/2021 - 14:39

Wed, 16 Jun 2021 14:39:30 +0000


$2.3 Million Awarded to Reimburse Repair Costs for Duplin County Roads Damaged by Hurricane Florence
$2.3 Million Awarded to Reimburse Repair Costs for Duplin County Roads Damaged by Hurricane Florence

RALEIGH, N.C. The State of North Carolina and FEMA have approved $2,370,881 to reimburse the state’s Department of Transportation for the repair of roads in Duplin County damaged by Hurricane Florence in 2018.

Funding from FEMA’s Public Assistance Program partially reimburses the costs for labor and materials, including stone and asphalt repairs to road surfaces, replacement of culverts and restoration of embankments.

FEMA’s share of the cost for this project is $1,778,161 and the state’s share is $592,720. FEMA covers 75 percent of eligible costs and the remaining 25 percent is paid for by the state. The federal share is paid directly to the state to disburse to agencies, local governments and eligible private nonprofit organizations that incurred costs.

For more information on North Carolina’s recovery from Hurricane Florence, visit ncdps.gov/Florence and FEMA.gov/Disaster/4393. Follow us on Twitter: @NCEmergency and @FEMARegion4

neily.chapman Wed, 06/16/2021 - 14:04

Wed, 16 Jun 2021 14:04:28 +0000


FEMA, State approve $29.6 million for Baldwin County debris removal after Hurricane Sally
FEMA, State approve $29.6 million for Baldwin County debris removal after Hurricane Sally

​​​​​FEMA,State approve $29.6 million for Baldwin County debris removal after Hurricane Sally

CLANTON, Ala -- FEMA and the State of Alabama have approved $29,636,980 to reimburse Baldwin County for debris removal after Hurricane Sally.

During the incident period, Hurricane Sally made landfall with hurricane force winds, and heavy rain, which deposited significant debris throughout the state of Alabama. This created an immediate threat to the health and safety of the general public. In response to the event, the county utilized contracts and forced labor account labor and equipment to conduct the debris removal and monitoring in the heavily impacted areas.  The debris removal operations collected approximately 1,950,831 cubic yards of vegetative debris and 137,067 CY of construction and demolition debris, from county roads, right-of-ways and public property throughout the jurisdiction. The applicant contractors, removed the debris to thirteen temporary staging areas, mulched, with final removal to four permitted landfill facilities.

This work for debris removal was performed during the period of 11/1/2020 through 12/31/2020.

FEMA’s share of the grant is 75 percent, or $21,968,161 with the remainder funded by state and local and county governments. This in addition to the $32 million already obligated to the county totals $54.4 million in FEMA funds to reimburse the county for their eligible disaster related expenses.

FEMA’s Public Assistance program provides grants to state, tribal and local governments, and certain private nonprofit organizations, including houses of worship, so communities can quickly recover from major disasters or emergencies. 

The Alabama Emergency Management Agency works with FEMA during all phases of the PA program and conducts final reviews of FEMA-approved projects.  Applicants work directly with FEMA to identify damages, develop project worksheets, develop scopes of work, and provide required documentation to validate eligible damages and costs. Once the applicant provides the required documentation and it is validated FEMA can begin dispersing funds. Following approvals by FEMA and AEMA, FEMA obligates funding for the project.

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FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

brianasummer.fenton Wed, 06/16/2021 - 14:03

Wed, 16 Jun 2021 14:03:32 +0000


$2.4 Million Awarded to Reimburse Repair Costs for Sampson County Roads Damaged by Hurricane Florence
$2.4 Million Awarded to Reimburse Repair Costs for Sampson County Roads Damaged by Hurricane Florence

RALEIGH, N.C.The State of North Carolina and FEMA have approved $2,480,566 to reimburse the state’s Department of Transportation for the repair of roads in Sampson County damaged by Hurricane Florence in 2018.

Funding from FEMA’s Public Assistance Program partially reimburses the costs for stone and asphalt repairs to road surfaces, as well as replacement of guardrails, headwalls, pipes and culverts and restoration of embankments.

FEMA’s share of the cost for this project is $1,860,424 and the state’s share is $620,142. FEMA covers 75 percent of eligible costs and the remaining 25 percent is paid for by the state. The federal share is paid directly to the state to disburse to agencies, local governments and eligible private nonprofit organizations that incurred costs.

For more information on North Carolina’s recovery from Hurricane Florence, visit ncdps.gov/Florence and FEMA.gov/Disaster/4393. Follow us on Twitter: @NCEmergency and @FEMARegion4.

neily.chapman Wed, 06/16/2021 - 14:01

Wed, 16 Jun 2021 14:01:00 +0000


More Than $3.7 Million in Federal Grants Reimbursed to Boston Housing Authority and The City of Boston For Their Emergency Feeding Program
More Than $3.7 Million in Federal Grants Reimbursed to Boston Housing Authority and The City of Boston For Their Emergency Feeding Program

REGION 1 – FEMA and the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency recently announced two federal grants for feeding Bostonians who experienced food insecurity caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Together, the two grants provided over $3.7 million reimbursing the Boston Housing Authority and the City of Boston for their emergency feeding programs. Both grants covered 100% of the eligible costs submitted to FEMA. The Boston Housing Authority is a public agency of the City of Boston.

A $1,773,736 grant was awarded to the Boston Housing Authority to help feed many vulnerable residents from Sept. 1, 2020 through Jan. 31, 2021. The program provided prepared meals to qualified individuals and families, including seniors, low-income families and those social distancing and quarantining.

Boston Housing Authority officials envisioned this program, enrolled participants and oversaw the program. It was created for residents at more than 30 properties who were not being serviced by other meal programs. In partnership with City Fresh Foods, YMCA of Greater Boston, Commonwealth Kitchen and Haley House, prepared meals were distributed to participating families at designated sites. In this part of the program, about 10,000 meals were prepared and delivered per week at full capacity.

A $1,956,060 grant was awarded to the City for groceries bought and distributed to help feed thousands in need from Sept. 14 through Dec. 31, 2020. The program provided nutritious food every week to approved individuals and families in underserved populations.  About 3,000 households per week were served.

The city’s Age Strong Commission staff managed this program’s enrollment of individuals and families, maintained a database of all who received deliveries and detailed any follow-up required. Commission staff coordinated daily with partner About Fresh to purchase, package and deliver groceries.

Both projects were funded through FEMA’s Public Assistance Program, which reimburses eligible applicants for actions taken in the immediate response to and during recovery from a major disaster. Eligible applicants include commonwealths, states, federally recognized Tribal governments, local governments and certain private non-profit organizations.

These Public Assistance Program project applications were submitted by the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency. FEMA awarded funding for these projects directly to the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, which worked directly with the applicants to ensure all terms and conditions of the awards were met before funds were disbursed.

“We are pleased to provide funds to help accomplish the mission of feeding Bostonians who were struggling during coronavirus pandemic,” said Acting Region 1 Administrator and Federal Coordinating Officer Paul Ford, who oversees FEMA’s operations throughout New England. “We will continue to work closely with the City of Boston, the Boston Housing Authority, the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as our shared efforts to respond to the pandemic continues.”

As of June 14, FEMA’s Public Assistance Program obligated more than $736.1 million in 293 projects related to the COVID-19 pandemic in Massachusetts. Additional information about the program is at https://www.fema.gov/public-assistance-local-state-tribal-and-non-profit.

 

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FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters

adrien.urbani Wed, 06/16/2021 - 13:33

Wed, 16 Jun 2021 13:33:02 +0000


FEMA Approves $16.6 Million for Water Distribution and Control Facilities
FEMA Approves $16.6 Million for Water Distribution and Control Facilities

A portion of these funds will go towards projects in Culebra and Santa Isabel, while PRASA’s Central Laboratory advances in its construction

GUAYNABO, Puerto Rico — The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) awarded nearly $5 million for construction work at three important water distribution and control facilities. This obligation will repair 12 land irrigation pumps in Santa Isabel and a flood control channel in Culebra.

“These projects address issues of vital importance related to the safety and quality of drinking water consumed in Puerto Rico, the protection of a vulnerable population in the island municipality of Culebra, as well as investing in machinery that will allow to intensify production in the agricultural sector,” said Puerto Rico Federal Disaster Recovery Coordinator, José G. Baquero.

Among the water control projects already underway, one of the most significant is the Central Laboratory of the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA), which is responsible for analyzing the purity of drinking water and providing the proper treatment of wastewater in Puerto Rico.

The Agency allocated close to $1 million to demolish the original structure that was devastated after Hurricane María, and to begin engineering studies and construct a new building, work that began earlier this year. Meanwhile, an additional $2.6 million was assigned to habilitate a temporary facility in the premises of the building in Caguas, so that the laboratory would remain operational.

“The proposed project consists of the design and construction of a new 47,500 square foot building, in compliance with Puerto Rico's new building codes. This laboratory will benefit all the Authority's customers, both residential and commercial. The Central Laboratory analyzes compliance parameters required by state and federal regulations,” said PRASA Executive President Doriel Pagán Crespo.

On the other hand, nearly $2.9 million was allocated to the Puerto Rico Land Authority (PRLA) to repair 12 irrigation systems that sustain the productive quality of agricultural land in the Santa Isabel valley. The ATPR is the guardian and administrator of over 85,000 acres of agricultural land in Puerto Rico.

One of the agricultural businesses benefiting from this allocation is a 1,200-acre farm that produces about 6,300 tons of mangos annually for the local market and for export to the United States and Europe. These funds will be used to replace the system’s pumps and filters, repair its electrical infrastructure and rehabilitate the building that houses the pumps. In addition, to avoid the effect of future damage, the obligation includes nearly $26,000 for mitigation upgrades, which will reinforce the building with stronger construction materials.

“Improving the Land Authority's irrigation system is going to have a great impact on our productions and is going to be of great benefit to the stability of the crops. For a farmer it is fundamental to improve the irrigation system,” said agronomist Petra Rivera of MS Mango Farm.

Likewise, in Culebra, an obligation of over $2.1 million will help repair and improve the Resaca Channel, an intermittent creek that was created to protect the airport and roads from flash floods. Built in 1950, the water channel is over a kilometer long and protects over 500 residents of the Villa Muñeco community of Barrio Flamenco.

“Being a small island, the airport is extremely important to sustain our economy, as well as to transport us quickly between islands, especially in emergency situations”, explained Ariel Vázquez, a businessowner and resident of the Villa Muñeco sector.

In addition to repairing and building the water channel – work that includes replacing part of the embankment and building concrete sidewalks – over $312,000 will be used to reinforce the structure with steel and increase the thickness of the retaining walls.

Manuel A. Laboy Rivera, Executive Director of the Puerto Rico Central Office for Recovery, Reconstruction and Resiliency (COR3), said that these projects will address situations that for years have affected thousands of citizens. “At COR3 we will offer the necessary assistance in matters related to the development of these projects,” Laboy Rivera added.

For more information on Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane María, visit fema.gov/disaster/4339 and recuperacion.pr. Follow us on our social networks at Facebook.com/FEMAPuertoRico, Facebook.com/COR3pr and Twitter @COR3pr.

 

frances.acevedo-pico Wed, 06/16/2021 - 11:42

Wed, 16 Jun 2021 11:42:27 +0000


FEMA Announces 2021-2022 Youth Preparedness Council
FEMA Announces 2021-2022 Youth Preparedness Council

WASHINGTON -- Today, FEMA announced the 2021–2022 Youth Preparedness Council members. FEMA selected nine new members to join six returning council members. Members are selected based on their dedication to public service, community involvement and potential to increase levels of community resilience throughout the country.

FEMA created the council in 2012 to bring together diverse young leaders interested in strengthening disaster preparedness across the nation and within their communities.

The new 2021 council members are:

  • Isaac Doll of Colorado.
  • Aubrey Dockins of Florida.
  • Miles Butler of Idaho.
  • Beitris Boyreau-Millar of Maryland.
  • Ranjana Ramesh of Massachusetts.
  • Mirika Jambudi of New Jersey.
  • Megan Cameron of New York.
  • Amira Seay of Texas.
  • Shivani Jayaprakasam of Washington.

The returning council members are:

  • Nyl Aziaya of Alabama.
  • Nico Bremeau of California.
  • Devangana Rana of Illinois.
  • Vishnu Iyer of Indiana.
  • Hunter Tobey of Massachusetts.
  • Amanda Hingorani of Nebraska.

The council supports FEMA’s commitment to build a culture of preparedness in the United States and provides an avenue to engage young people by considering their perspectives, feedback and opinions. Council members meet with FEMA staff throughout their term to provide input on strategies, initiatives and projects.

This year, each council member will participate in the Youth Preparedness Council Summit held virtually in late July. During this annual event, members will participate in online preparedness activities; learn from senior leaders in national preparedness; and engage with FEMA community preparedness staff who offer support and mentorship throughout their term.

Each year, 15 teens serve on this distinguished council. The next application cycle will open in early 2022. Teens in the eighth through 11th grades may apply online at https://community.fema.gov/applytoYPC.

To learn more about FEMA’s Youth Preparedness Council, visit: http://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness-council

mayshaunt.gary Tue, 06/15/2021 - 19:39

Tue, 15 Jun 2021 19:39:12 +0000


Don’t Delay, Apply for FEMA’s COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Program Today
Don’t Delay, Apply for FEMA’s COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Program Today

PHILADELPHIA – The COVID-19 pandemic has been incredibly difficult for all Americans, but even more so for those who lost a loved one to the virus. The unexpected and sometimes sudden loss of a loved one has placed a heavy burden on many thousands of Americans.

FEMA is offering help through the establishment of the COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Program. This new program allows eligible funeral expenses to be reimbursed directly to the loved ones who incurred those expenses. Individuals who apply may receive up to $9,000 per funeral and a maximum of $35,500 for multiple funerals that occurred within the same state or territory. The sooner people with eligible expenses begin their application, the sooner they can receive their reimbursement. “When people think of FEMA’s role in the COVID-19 response, they often think of the work we have done to get shots in arms. That is an important and ongoing mission, but there are other ways we offer support,” said FEMA Region 3 Acting Regional Administrator Janice Barlow. “Our hearts go out to those grieving the loss of a loved one to COVID-19. We hope that, through our Funeral Assistance Program, FEMA can help ease some of that burden.”

 

One of the most important steps for individuals interested in applying is to first understand the program’s eligibility and documentation requirements.

To be eligible for funeral assistance, you must meet these conditions:

  • The death must have occurred in the United States, including the U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia.
  • The death certificate must indicate the death was attributed to COVID-19.
  • The person applying on behalf of the deceased individual must be a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien who incurred funeral expenses after January 20, 2020.

 

If you had COVID-19 funeral expenses, we encourage you to gather the following documentation and have it ready when you start your application:

  • An official death certificate that attributes the death directly or indirectly to COVID-19 and shows that the death occurred in the United States, including the U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia.
  • Funeral expenses documents (receipts, funeral home contract, etc.) that includes the applicant’s name, the deceased person’s name, the amount of funeral expenses, and the dates the funeral expenses happened.
  • Proof of funds received from other sources specifically for use toward funeral costs. We are not able to duplicate benefits received from burial or funeral insurance, financial assistance received from voluntary agencies, government agencies, or other sources.

 

The program does reimburse eligible expenses; however, patience is encouraged upon submitting your application. It can take several weeks from the time all the necessary documentation has been collected for the funds to be disbursed. The best way to reduce the wait and speed up the process is to be prepared with all of the required paperwork when you start the process. After you apply, stay tuned for any communications from FEMA as there may be follow-up questions needed to continue processing the application.

How to Apply

Call this dedicated toll-free phone number to get a COVID-19 Funeral Assistance application completed with help from FEMA's representatives. Multilingual services will be available.

COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Line Number

Applications began on April 12, 2021 844-684-6333 | TTY: 800-462-7585

Hours of Operation: Monday - Friday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time

If you use a relay service, such as your videophone, Innocaption or CapTel, please provide your specific number assigned to that service. It is important that FEMA is able to contact you, and you should be aware phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number.

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FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters. We serve the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

amanda.hancher Tue, 06/15/2021 - 17:09

Tue, 15 Jun 2021 17:09:18 +0000