Inter-Tribal
Emergency
Management
Coalition

ITEMC
PO Box 1729
Okmulgee, OK  74447
 US Department of Homeland Security - Federal Emergency Management Agency          FEMA NEWS

Latest Top (20) News


Public Notice - Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation), DR-4561
Public Notice - Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation), DR-4561

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) hereby gives notice to the public of its intent to reimburse tribal government and eligible private non-profit organizations for eligible costs incurred to repair and/or replace facilities damaged by severe storms on Aug. 10, 2020. This notice applies to the Public Assistance (PA) program implemented under the authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 USC §§ 5121-5207, as amended.

Under a major disaster declaration for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation) FEMA-4561-DR, signed by the President on September 10, 2020, the following areas have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: 

Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation) and associated lands for Public Assistance.  The Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa will receive 75 percent federal funding and is eligible for HMGP funding.

This public notice concerns public assistance activities that may affect historic properties, activities that are located in, or affect, wetland areas or the 100-year floodplain (areas determined to have a one-percent probability of flooding in any given year) and critical actions within the 500-year floodplain. Such activities may adversely affect the historic property, floodplain or wetland, or may result in continuing vulnerability to flood damage.

Such activities may include restoring eligible damaged facilities located in a floodplain to pre-disaster condition. Examples of such activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

1.Non-emergency debris removal and disposal;

2.Non-emergency protective measures;

3.Repair/replacement of roads, including streets, culverts and bridges;

4.Repair/replacement of public dams, reservoirs and channels;

5.Repair/replacement of public buildings and related equipment;

6.Repair/replacement of public water control facilities, pipes and distribution systems;

7.Repair/replacement of public utilities, including sewage treatment plants, sewers and electrical power distribution systems; and

8.Repair/replacement of eligible private, non-profit facilities (hospitals, educational centers, emergency and custodial care services, etc.).

The President’s Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, require that all federal actions in or affecting the 100-year floodplain or wetland areas be reviewed for opportunities to move the facility out of the floodplain or wetland and to reduce the risk of future damage or loss from flooding and minimize harms to wetlands. However, FEMA has determined that in certain situations, there are no alternatives to restoring an eligible facility located in the floodplain to its pre-disaster condition.  These situations meet all of the following criteria:

1.The FEMA estimated cost of repairs is less than 50 percent of the estimated cost to replace the facility and the replacement cost of the facility is less than $100,000;

2.The facility is not located in a floodway or coastal high hazard area;

3.The facility has not sustained structural damage in a previous presidentially declared flood disaster or emergency;

4.The facility is not defined as critical (e.g., hospital, power generating plant, contains dangerous materials, emergency operation center, etc.).

FEMA will provide assistance to restore the facilities described above to their pre-disaster condition except when measures to mitigate the effects of future flooding may be incorporated into the restoration work. For example, insufficient waterway openings under culverts and bridges may cause water backup to wash out the structures. The water backup could wash out the facility and could damage other facilities in the area.  Increasing the size of the waterway opening would mitigate, or lessen, the potential for this damage. Additional examples of mitigation measures include providing erosion protection at bridge abutments or levees and extending entrance tubes on sewage lift stations.

Disaster assistance projects to restore facilities which do not meet the criteria listed above must undergo a detailed review. The review will include a study to determine if the facility can be moved out of the floodplain. The public is invited to participate in the review. The public may identify alternatives for restoring the facility and may participate in analyzing the impact of the alternatives on the facility and the floodplain. An address and phone number for obtaining information about specific assistance projects is provided at the end of this Notice. The final determination regarding the restoration of these facilities in a floodplain will be announced in future Public Notices.

Due to the urgent need for and/or use of the certain facilities in a floodplain, actions to restore the facility may have started before the federal inspector visits the site. Some of these facilities may meet the criteria for a detailed review to determine if they should be relocated. Generally, facilities may be restored in their original location where at least one of the following conditions applies:

1.The facility, such as a flood control device or bridge, is functionally dependent on its floodplain location;

2.The facility, such as a park or other open-use space, already represents sound floodplain management and, therefore, there is no need to change it;

3.The facility, such as a road or a utility, is an integral part of a larger network that could not be relocated economically.

4.Emergency action is needed to address a threat to public health and safety.

The effects of not relocating the facilities will be examined. In each case, the examination must show an overriding public need for the facility at its original location that clearly outweighs the requirements in the Executive Order to relocate the facility out of the floodplain. FEMA will also consult state and local officials to make certain that no actions taken will violate either state or local floodplain protection standards. The restoration of these facilities may also incorporate certain measures designed to mitigate the effects of future flooding. This will be the only Notice to the public concerning these facilities.

The National Historic Preservation Act requires federal agencies to take into account the effects of their undertakings on historic properties. Those actions or activities affecting buildings, structures, districts or objects 50 years or older or that affect archeological sites or undisturbed ground will require further review to determine if the property is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (Register). If the property is determined to be eligible for the Register, and FEMA’s undertaking will adversely affect it, FEMA will provide additional Public Notices. For historic properties not adversely affected by FEMA’s undertaking, this will be the only Public Notice.

FEMA also intends to provide Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funding under Section 404 of the Stafford Act to the State of Iowa for the purposes of mitigating future disaster damages. Hazard mitigation projects may involve the construction of a new facility (e.g., retention pond, or debris dam), modification of an existing undamaged facility (e.g., improving waterway openings of bridges or culverts), and the relocation of facilities out of the floodplain. Subsequent Notices will provide more specific information as project proposals are developed.

Information about assistance projects may be obtained by submitting a written request to the Regional Environmental Officer, Kate Stojsavljevic.  Requests can be sent via email to kate.stojsavljevic@fema.dhs.gov or mailed to DHS-FEMA Region VII; 11224 Holmes Road; Kansas City, MO 64131. Comments should be sent in writing to the Regional Environmental Officer, at the above addresses, within 15 days of the date of publication of this Notice.

thomas.wise Wed, 09/23/2020 - 17:33

Wed, 23 Sep 2020 21:33:16 +0000


Public Notice - Iowa DR-4557
Public Notice - Iowa DR-4557

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) hereby gives notice to the public of its intent to reimburse state and local Iowa governments and agencies, and eligible private non-profit organizations for eligible costs incurred to repair and/or replace facilities damaged by severe storms on Aug. 10, 2020. This notice applies to the Individual Assistance (IA), Public Assistance (PA), and Hazard Mitigation Grant (HMGP) programs implemented under the authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 USC §§ 5121-5207, as amended.

Under a major disaster declaration for Iowa (FEMA-4557-DR-IA), signed by the President on August 17, 2020, the following counties in the state of Iowa have been designated adversely affected by the August 10 disaster incident and are eligible for PA:

Benton, Boone, Cedar, Clinton, Dallas, Greene, Grundy, Guthrie, Hardin, Iowa, Jackson, Jasper, Johnson, Jones, Linn, Marshall, Muscatine, Polk, Poweshiek, Scott, Story, Tama, and Washington counties. All counties will receive 75 percent federal funding.

The following counties in the state of Iowa have been designated adversely affected by the disaster and are eligible for IA:

Benton, Boone, Cedar, Jasper, Linn, Marshall, Polk, Poweshiek, Scott, Story, and Tama.

All counties in the state of Iowa are eligible for HMGP.

This public notice concerns public assistance activities that may affect historic properties, activities that are located in, or affect, wetland areas or the 100-year floodplain (areas determined to have a one-percent probability of flooding in any given year) and critical actions within the 500-year floodplain. Such activities may adversely affect the historic property, floodplain or wetland, or may result in continuing vulnerability to flood damage.

Such activities may include restoring eligible damaged facilities located in a floodplain to pre-disaster condition. Examples of such activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

1.Non-emergency debris removal and disposal;

2.Non-emergency protective measures;

3.Repair/replacement of roads, including streets, culverts and bridges;

4.Repair/replacement of public dams, reservoirs and channels;

5.Repair/replacement of public buildings and related equipment;

6.Repair/replacement of public water control facilities, pipes and distribution systems;

7.Repair/replacement of public utilities, including sewage treatment plants, sewers and electrical power distribution systems; and

8.Repair/replacement of eligible private, non-profit facilities (hospitals, educational centers, emergency and custodial care services, etc.).

The President’s Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, require that all federal actions in or affecting the 100-year floodplain or wetland areas be reviewed for opportunities to move the facility out of the floodplain or wetland and to reduce the risk of future damage or loss from flooding and minimize harms to wetlands. However, FEMA has determined that in certain situations, there are no alternatives to restoring an eligible facility located in the floodplain to its pre-disaster condition.  These situations meet all of the following criteria:

1.The FEMA estimated cost of repairs is less than 50 percent of the estimated cost to replace the facility and the replacement cost of the facility is less than $100,000;

2.The facility is not located in a floodway or coastal high hazard area;

3.The facility has not sustained structural damage in a previous presidentially declared flood disaster or emergency;

4.The facility is not defined as critical (e.g., hospital, power generating plant, contains dangerous materials, emergency operation center, etc.).

FEMA will provide assistance to restore the facilities described above to their pre-disaster condition except when measures to mitigate the effects of future flooding may be incorporated into the restoration work. For example, insufficient waterway openings under culverts and bridges may cause water backup to wash out the structures. The water backup could wash out the facility and could damage other facilities in the area.  Increasing the size of the waterway opening would mitigate, or lessen, the potential for this damage. Additional examples of mitigation measures include providing erosion protection at bridge abutments or levees and extending entrance tubes on sewage lift stations.

Disaster assistance projects to restore facilities which do not meet the criteria listed above must undergo a detailed review. The review will include a study to determine if the facility can be moved out of the floodplain. The public is invited to participate in the review. The public may identify alternatives for restoring the facility and may participate in analyzing the impact of the alternatives on the facility and the floodplain. An address and phone number for obtaining information about specific assistance projects is provided at the end of this Notice. The final determination regarding the restoration of these facilities in a floodplain will be announced in future Public Notices.

Due to the urgent need for and/or use of the certain facilities in a floodplain, actions to restore the facility may have started before the federal inspector visits the site. Some of these facilities may meet the criteria for a detailed review to determine if they should be relocated. Generally, facilities may be restored in their original location where at least one of the following conditions applies:

1.The facility, such as a flood control device or bridge, is functionally dependent on its floodplain location;

2.The facility, such as a park or other open-use space, already represents sound floodplain management and, therefore, there is no need to change it;

3.The facility, such as a road or a utility, is an integral part of a larger network that could not be relocated economically.

4.Emergency action is needed to address a threat to public health and safety.

The effects of not relocating the facilities will be examined. In each case, the examination must show an overriding public need for the facility at its original location that clearly outweighs the requirements in the Executive Order to relocate the facility out of the floodplain. FEMA will also consult state and local officials to make certain that no actions taken will violate either state or local floodplain protection standards. The restoration of these facilities may also incorporate certain measures designed to mitigate the effects of future flooding. This will be the only Notice to the public concerning these facilities.

The National Historic Preservation Act requires federal agencies to take into account the effects of their undertakings on historic properties. Those actions or activities affecting buildings, structures, districts or objects 50 years or older or that affect archeological sites or undisturbed ground will require further review to determine if the property is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (Register). If the property is determined to be eligible for the Register, and FEMA’s undertaking will adversely affect it, FEMA will provide additional Public Notices. For historic properties not adversely affected by FEMA’s undertaking, this will be the only Public Notice.

FEMA also intends to provide Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funding under Section 404 of the Stafford Act to the State of Iowa for the purposes of mitigating future disaster damages. Hazard mitigation projects may involve the construction of a new facility (e.g., retention pond, or debris dam), modification of an existing undamaged facility (e.g., improving waterway openings of bridges or culverts), and the relocation of facilities out of the floodplain. Subsequent Notices will provide more specific information as project proposals are developed.

Information about assistance projects may be obtained by submitting a written request to the Regional Environmental Officer, Kate Stojsavljevic.  Requests can be sent via email to kate.stojsavljevic@fema.dhs.gov or mailed to DHS-FEMA Region VII; 11224 Holmes Road; Kansas City, MO 64131. Comments should be sent in writing to the Regional Environmental Officer, at the above addresses, within 15 days of the date of publication of this Notice.

thomas.wise Wed, 09/23/2020 - 17:27

Wed, 23 Sep 2020 21:27:48 +0000


Plan Ahead Before Going Home
Plan Ahead Before Going Home

SALEM, Ore. – As evacuation levels change, people affected by the fires are eager to know when it is safe to go home. As conditions may be unknown in an area, it is important that residents follow the advice of local authorities to learn when it is safe to return. Residents should also check road closures and conditions to know the safest way to travel. Check roads by visiting Oregon Dept. of Transportation’s TripCheck.com.

Once local authorities have given the all-clear to re-enter properties, homeowners should take steps to protect themselves and others, when cleaning up after a wildfire. Many dangers may remain, such as ash and fire debris, which can be toxic.

Staying safe around ashes:

  • If you see ash or a layer of dust, keep children away until it has been cleaned.
  • Cloth face coverings, paper masks or bandanas are not effective at filtering out fine airborne ash, dust or asbestos fibers. N95 or KN95 respirators, if properly fit, tested and worn, can offer protection from airborne particles.
  • Avoid activities that could stir up ash and make it airborne again, like using a leaf blower, dry sweeping, or vacuuming without a HEPA filter.
  • Use rubber gloves when cleaning up ash. Wash any ash off of your body or clothing right away.
  • To clean up ash outdoors: Gently dampen the ash – do not use a pressure washer, which will generate dust before it wets things down. Then use a vacuum with a high efficiency HEPA filter if you have one. If you don't have a HEPA-equipped vacuum, gently sweep or scoop up the ash.
  • To clean up ash indoors: Use a damp cloth to clean surfaces, a wet mop on floors. Do not use a vacuum to clean up ash unless it has a high efficiency HEPA filter.
  • Turn on an air purifier or ventilation system with a HEPA filter, if you have one, to help remove particles from indoor air.
  • Find more safety tips on the Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality website.

Making your yard safe:

  • Extinguish hot embers. Check for them in yard debris, rain gutters or crawl spaces, on the roof, and under overhangs and decks.
  • Clear away debris. Move it away from the house to the edge of your home.
  • Check the electric meter. If there is visible damage, don’t turn the breaker on. Call your utility company.
  • Stay clear of electrical wires on the ground. Report them to your utility company.
  • Check the gas meter, gas lines or propane tank. If there is visible damage or if you smell gas, call your local utility or propane company.

Before entering structures: If you have safety concerns, have a qualified building inspector or structural engineer inspect your structures. Don’t enter if you smell gas. Turn off the power before you inspect your structure. Use a flashlight, but turn it on outside because the flashlight battery may produce a spark that can cause a fire.

Entering your structures safely:

  • Check for immediate dangers. This includes remaining fire and fire damage, and wild or domestic animals that may have taken refuge.
  • Check the attic. Embers may have entered through vents.
  • Keep appliances turned off until you have determined the electric meter and electrical lines are undamaged.
  • Discard food that has been exposed to heat, smoke, or soot.
  • Don’t drink or use water from the faucet until emergency officials say it’s okay. Water systems may become polluted if there is post-fire flooding.
  • Take safety precautions for utilities:
    • Electric – If you turn on the breaker and still have no power, contact your utility company.
    • Propane tank or  system – Turn off the valves and call your propane supplier to inspect the system.
    • Heating oil tank system – Call your supplier to inspect it before you use it.
    • Solar electrical system – Have it inspected by a licensed technician to verify the solar panels and wiring are safe.

Documenting Damage and contacting your insurance company. Call your insurance agent. Make a list of the damage and document it with photos and videos. Keep all receipts for repair and cleaning costs.

###

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362)  711/VRS - Video Relay Service). Multilingual operators are available. (Press 2 for Spanish). TTY call 800-462-7585.

hannah.weinstein Wed, 09/23/2020 - 13:48

Wed, 23 Sep 2020 17:48:11 +0000


State and Federal Funds Approved for Waubay Flood Mitigation Project
State and Federal Funds Approved for Waubay Flood Mitigation Project

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – FEMA has awarded a $1.66 million grant to the City of Waubay, South Dakota for home acquisitions. The grant will fund the purchase of ten properties that have been impacted by repetitive flooding caused by closed-basin lakes in Day County. This project will allow property owners to relocate away from the flood hazard and prevent future damage.

The project will include the purchase of each structure, demolition and returning the property to green space in perpetuity. These lots will be owned by the City of Waubay. The $1.66 million from FEMA represents a 75 percent cost-share of the project, which totals roughly $2.21 million. The State of South Dakota will contribute more than $221,000 with the local community responsible for the remaining costs.

“Acquisition projects like this allow property owners in high-risk areas a chance to relocate, permanently eliminating future flood losses.” Said FEMA Federal Coordinating Officer Jon Huss.

Funding for this grant is provided through FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP), which is designed to assist states, U.S. territories, federally-recognized tribes, and local communities in increasing their understanding and taking proactive action to help people reduce their losses from natural hazards. The goal is to reduce overall risk to the population and structures from future hazard events, while also reducing reliance on federal funding in future disasters.

The HMGP program is funded through a percentage of overall federal disaster response and recovery costs, ranging from 15 to 20 percent. South Dakota recently had an enhanced statewide hazard mitigation plan approved. This makes the state eligible for the maximum of 20 percent toward the program.

“Completing our enhanced mitigation plan demonstrated the commitment South Dakota has to minimizing the impact of future disasters,” said Tina Titze, State Coordinating Officer and the director of the state Office of Emergency Management. “The additional federal funding is helping to complete projects like this in Waubay and others around the state.”

Additional information about HMGP can be found at www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program

Brian.Hvinden Wed, 09/23/2020 - 13:05

Wed, 23 Sep 2020 17:05:09 +0000


Federal Aid for Utah Quake Tops $2 Million  
Federal Aid for Utah Quake Tops $2 Million  

SALT LAKE CITY – Six months after the Magna Earthquake shook Salt Lake and Davis counties, federal agencies have provided more than $2.2 million in loans and grants to help Utahns recover from the March 18 disaster and its aftershocks.

FEMA has approved more than $664,000 through its Individuals & Households Program (IHP), the majority of which is going to housing assistance to help homeowners impacted by the quake make repairs or find a temporary place to live.

In addition, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has approved $1.6 million in low-interest disaster loans for Utah businesses, private nonprofit organizations, homeowners and renters.

To date, more than 1,180 Utah residents have registered for federal assistance and FEMA housing inspectors have completed more than 520 virtual inspections of homes damaged by the quake and aftershocks.

For more information about fixing damages, rebuilding, and preparing for the next earthquake, email FEMA-R8-HMhelp@fema.dhs.gov.

For more information on Utah’s recovery from the Magna Quake, visit, www.fema.gov/disaster/4548, or https://earthquakes.utah.gov/magna-quake/

 

Brian.Hvinden Tue, 09/22/2020 - 17:32

Tue, 22 Sep 2020 21:32:47 +0000


Photos of Whole-of-Government Sally, Wildfires Response
Photos of Whole-of-Government Sally, Wildfires Response

WASHINGTON — FEMA continues close coordination with state, tribal and local governments for disaster response across the country, as the agency's administrator, Pete Gaynor, visited states impacted by recent fire and hurricane damage. President Trump approved a major disaster declaration for Alabama and emergency declarations for Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi to provide federal assistance and coordinate disaster relief efforts across the Gulf Coast. Major disaster declarations were also declared for California and Oregon wildfire response. FEMA teams and disaster recovery resources are on the ground assisting with state recovery efforts. Residents in affected states should continue paying attention to their local emergency managers for safety instructions.

FEMA Administrator Sees Mitigation Results Firsthand in Alabama

FEMA Administrator Pete Gaynor sees mitigation results firsthand at the Lodge at Gulf State Park in Alabama after Hurricane Sally

GULF SHORES, Ala. (Sept. 20, 2020) – FEMA Administrator Pete Gaynor (3rd from left) sees first-hand the mitigation efforts that the Lodge at Gulf State Park took that prevented any structural damage from Hurricane Sally. The hotel was rebuilt using mitigation measures to help withstand future storms, after being totally destroyed by Hurricane Ivan in 2004.

FEMA photo by Robert Kaufmann

Line Crews Work to Restore Power in Alabama

line crew utility trucks work delivering replacement power poles to restore power in alabama

BALDWIN COUNTY, Ala. (Sept. 18, 2020) -- Crews deliver replacement power poles to Baldwin County, Alabama. Restoring power following Hurricane Sally is a critical priority and one of the first steps in community recovery.   

   FEMA photo by Alexis Hall

Line Crews Work to Restore Power in Alabama

line crews replace a power pole to restore power in alabama

BALDWIN COUNTY, Ala. (Sept. 18, 2020) -- Crews replace a power pole in Baldwin County, Alabama, following Hurricane Sally. Restoring electricity to homes and businesses is a critical priority and one of the first steps in community recovery.

FEMA photo by Alexis Hall

Supplies are Loaded at FEMA Distribution Center for Transport to Florida

Supplies are Loaded at FEMA Distribution Center for Transport to Florida to help Hurricane Sally survivors

ATLANTA (Sept. 19, 2020) – Tarps are loaded onto trucks at FEMA’s Distribution Center in Atlanta for transportation to Florida. These tarps will help Hurricane Sally survivors protect their homes.

FEMA photo Crystal Paulk-Buchanan

Search and Rescue Teams Scour Fire-Damaged Areas for Survivors

Search and Rescue Team with working dog Scours Fire-Damaged Areas of Oregon for Survivors

PHOENIX, Ore. (Sept. 19, 2020) -- A blend of FEMA Urban Search and Rescue teams from all over the United States complete searches of an area damaged by the Almeda Fire. Historic wildfires have left many people in Oregon homeless, with some still missing.

FEMA photo by David Yost

Search and Rescue Teams Scour Fire-Damaged Areas for Survivors

Search and Rescue Team canine Nyx Rests while Scouring Fire-Damaged Areas for Survivors in Oregon

PHOENIX, Ore. (Sept. 19, 2020) -- Nyx, a search and rescue canine working with a handler from a FEMA Urban Search and Rescue team from Colorado, rests after searching through damage caused by the Almeda Fire. Historic wildfires have left many people in Oregon homeless, with some still missing.

FEMA photo by David Yost

Historic Wildfires Leave Destruction in their Wake

Historic Wildfires Leave Destruction in their Wake -  wires in the sky over a burned-out truck and partial wall

PHOENIX, Ore. (Sept. 19, 2020) -- Damage caused by the Almeda Fire has displaced people in Jackson County, located in southern Oregon. Historic wildfires have left many people in Oregon homeless, with some still missing.

FEMA photos by David Yost

Historic Wildfires Leave Destruction in their Wake

Historic Wildfires Leave Destruction in their Wake – a dashboard bubbled and cracked from heat

PHOENIX, Ore. (Sept. 19, 2020) -- Damage caused by the Almeda Fire has displaced people in Jackson County, located in southern Oregon. Historic wildfires have left many people in Oregon homeless, with some still missing.

FEMA photos by David Yost

luther.wills-dudich Tue, 09/22/2020 - 14:33

Tue, 22 Sep 2020 18:33:24 +0000


Louisiana Renters Can Apply for FEMA Assistance
Louisiana Renters Can Apply for FEMA Assistance

BATON ROUGE, La. – Renters whose home or property was damaged by Hurricane Laura can apply for federal disaster assistance.

Federal grants can help pay for temporary housing if a renter or homeowner is unable to return to a disaster-damaged home. The initial rental grant is for a 60-day period and can be reviewed for further assistance.

The deadline to register for FEMA help is Oct. 27, 2020.

Renters as well as homeowners may qualify for grants for essential personal property and other disaster-related expenses as well. These may include repairing or replacing:

  • Furniture, appliances, clothing, schoolbooks and supplies.
  • Occupational tools and other job-related equipment required by an employer as a condition of employment.
  • Primary vehicles.
  • Medical and dental bills.

Visit DisasterAssistance.gov and enter your address to find out if your parish is declared for Individual Assistance.

To register for help:

  • Call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585).
  • Visit disasterassistance.gov/.
  • Download the FEMA Mobile App.

Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, Innocaption or CapTel should update FEMA with their specific number assigned to that service.

Survivors who have questions about the status of their federal disaster assistance applications or how to appeal determination letters may call the FEMA Helpline. They can also check the status of their disaster assistance applications online at DisasterAssistance.gov.

Part of the FEMA disaster assistance registration process includes providing a call-back phone number for FEMA to contact you to set up a remote home inspection for damage caused by the disaster and other Helpline information. It is strongly recommended if you use a relay service, such as your videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel to provide your specific number assigned to that service to FEMA. It is important that FEMA can contact you, and you should be aware phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number.

For the latest information on Hurricane Laura, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4559 or follow the FEMA Region 6 Twitter account at twitter.com/FEMARegion6.

 

christopher.teed Tue, 09/22/2020 - 13:34

Tue, 22 Sep 2020 17:34:05 +0000


Flood Insurance Policies Purchased After Hurricane Irma Expiring This Year
Flood Insurance Policies Purchased After Hurricane Irma Expiring This Year

ATLANTA - Following the devastating disasters and hurricane season of 2017, FEMA purchased three-year flood insurance policies for thousands of disaster survivors whose homes were flooded. Those policies are set to expire this year, and survivors need to purchase a new flood insurance policy, or obtain other flood insurance, in order to remain eligible for future

FEMA assistance.

Part of the eligibility of receiving financial assistance after a flood is that a homeowner or renter must obtain and maintain flood insurance to ensure that there is no lapse in coverage. If a property affected by a flood is sold, the new owners are required to have flood insurance for the property as well.

Participants must purchase a flood insurance policy or they will be ineligible to receive most forms of assistance in subsequent disasters.

In Georgia there are 67 policies expiring this year from Hurricane Irma.

Flood Insurance Can Be Key to Recovery Flood insurance policies are crucial to recover quickly following a flood event as homeowners and renters’ policies do not typically cover flood damage.

Additionally, flood insurance will pay claims regardless of whether there is a major disaster declaration. Flood insurance claims can be paid for such events as flash flooding, storm sewer backup, river overflow, storm surge, mudslides or tropical systems.

Since its inception in 1968, FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program has paid more than $69 billion in flood claims to help survivors rebuild their lives following flood events.

  • To find an insurance carrier or agent, visit FloodSmart.gov, or call FEMA NFIP Direct toll-free, (800) 638-6620, option 2.
  • For more information about the National Flood Insurance Program and or insurance, call the National Flood Insurance General Call Center at 800-427-4661.
  • If you have questions about your Group Flood Insurance Policy, call the National Flood Insurance Direct Call Center at 800-638-6620.

                                                                            ###

                                     FEMA’s mission: Helping people before, during, and after disasters.

neily.chapman Tue, 09/22/2020 - 12:25

Tue, 22 Sep 2020 16:25:18 +0000


Flood Insurance Policies Purchased After Hurricane Irma Expiring This Year
Flood Insurance Policies Purchased After Hurricane Irma Expiring This Year

ATLANTA - Following the devastating disasters and hurricane season of 2017, FEMA purchased three-year flood insurance policies for thousands of disaster survivors whose homes were flooded. Those policies are set to expire this year, and survivors need to purchase a new flood insurance policy, or obtain other flood insurance, in order to remain eligible for future FEMA assistance.

Part of the eligibility of receiving financial assistance after a flood is that a homeowner or renter must obtain and maintain flood insurance to ensure that there is no lapse in coverage. If a property affected by a flood is sold, the new owners are required to have flood insurance for the property as well.

Participants must purchase a flood insurance policy or they will be ineligible to receive most forms of assistance in subsequent disasters.

In Florida there are more than 2,500 policies expiring this year from Hurricane Irma.

Flood Insurance Can Be Key to Recovery Flood insurance policies are crucial to recover quickly following a flood event as homeowners and renters’ policies do not typically cover flood damage.

Additionally, flood insurance will pay claims regardless of whether there is a major disaster declaration. Flood insurance claims can be paid for such events as flash flooding, storm sewer backup, river overflow, storm surge, mudslides or tropical systems.

Since its inception in 1968, FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program has paid more than $69 billion in flood claims to help survivors rebuild their lives following flood events.

  • To find an insurance carrier or agent, visit FloodSmart.gov, or call FEMA NFIP Direct toll-free, (800) 638-6620, option 2.
  • For more information about the National Flood Insurance Program and or insurance, call the National Flood Insurance General Call Center at 800-427-4661.
  • If you have questions about your Group Flood Insurance Policy, call the National Flood Insurance Direct Call Center at 800-638-6620.

                                                                         ###

                                 FEMA’s mission: Helping people before, during, and after disasters.

neily.chapman Tue, 09/22/2020 - 12:19

Tue, 22 Sep 2020 16:19:16 +0000


41 Municipalities Among the Recipients of $91.4 million in FEMA Grants
41 Municipalities Among the Recipients of $91.4 million in FEMA Grants

Obligations include over $461,000 for the Punta Mulas Lighthouse and community center in Vieques

GUAYNABO, Puerto Rico – FEMA and the Puerto Rico Central Office for Recovery, Reconstruction and Resilience, or COR3, announced the obligation of over $91.4 million in additional funds for 135 projects related to the recovery and reconstruction of Puerto Rico after Hurricane María. These grants were obligated during the week of September 11-17.

Among the most recent allocations is about $461,000 for repairs to the historic Punta Mulas Lighthouse built in 1895 and its community center, located on the north coast of Vieques. Formerly the house of a French bullfighter, this cultural landmark served as the municipality’s first museum in the 90s. Today, it is a tourist attraction where the beautiful views of the island of Puerto Rico can be enjoyed.

“Within our urban area, [the lighthouse] is one of the top three places most visited by tourists. The Punta Mula community center was the main community center for all Viequenses. For us as a municipality it is an additional source of income, since both the center and the surrounding green areas are rented out,” said Vieques Mayor Víctor Emeric Catarineau.

Meanwhile, over $678,000 was approved for the municipality of Coamo to repave several roads in the Barrio Santa Catalina. These five streets allow around 125 families to reach their homes.

“The Municipality of Coamo will be working with the auction and contracting to expedite it as much as possible. These projects come to solve access and road safety problems for the residents of the mentioned areas,” said Coamo’s Mayor, Juan Carlos "Tato" Garcia Padilla.

On the other hand, just over $218,000 was obligated for the municipality of Hormigueros to repair five recreational facilities. Among these is the municipal greenhouse where more than 2,000 pounds of green peppers are grown each month and sold to local businesses, which also generates 5 direct employments. In addition, the Mirador Torre Vista a la Bahía located in the Hoya Grande Sector, with a view to the bay of Mayagüez, is also part of this list. Likewise, the Paseo de la Abolición, the municipality’s passive playground and the municipal pools and gazebos, which have a capacity for 50 people, will be repaired.

For his part, the first municipal executive indicated that all these projects are important for the development of the municipality and these assignments speed up the reconstruction process. “I am very happy that the agricultural greenhouse has received an obligation since it is a novel project where we demonstrate that it is possible to export and consume by producing locally,” added the mayor of Hormigueros, Pedro Juan García.

A part of these funds will be used to prevent future damage as mitigation measures. In Coamo, about $55,000 will be used to install an asphalt reinforcement system on all impacted roads. In Vieques, about $17,000 will be used to upgrade the Punta Mulas Lighthouse with metal exterior panels and the replacement of 1,800 square feet of asphalt roofing and for the community center to provide an anchorage system to resist wind pressure, among other measures. Meanwhile, in Hormigueros, roofing at Mirador Torre Vista a la Bahía will be reinforced.

The most recent approved grants are broken down as follows:

  • Nearly $37 million for road and bridge repairs;
  • Over $25.7 million for administrative expenses of municipalities and government agencies;
  • Over $11.2 million for repairs to parks and recreational facilities;
  • Over $8.5 million for emergency protective measures;
  • Over $6.9 million for repairs to public buildings and equipment;
  • Over $678,000 for debris removal; and
  • Over $105,000 for utilities.

FEMA works with COR3 through the federal agency's Public Assistance program to obligate recovery funds to private nonprofit organizations, municipalities and agencies of the Government of Puerto Rico for expenses related to Hurricanes Irma and María. To date, over $7.3 billion has been awarded to Puerto Rico as part of FEMA's Public Assistance program.

For more information on Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane Maria, please visit fema.gov/disaster/4339 and recuperacion.pr. Follow us on social networks at Facebook.com/FEMAPuertoRico, Facebook.com/COR3pr and on Twitter @COR3pr.

For more details on the 135 most recent projects, click here

Projects Obligated numbers
light house

VIEQUES, Puerto Rico (September 18, 2020) – Among the most recent allocations is about $461,000 for repairs to the historic Punta Mulas Lighthouse built in 1895 and its community center, located on the north coast of Vieques. 

frances.acevedo-pico Tue, 09/22/2020 - 07:46

Tue, 22 Sep 2020 11:46:02 +0000