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 US Department of Homeland Security - Federal Emergency Management Agency          FEMA NEWS

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Public Invited to Review Flood Maps in Arlington County, Virginia
Public Invited to Review Flood Maps in Arlington County, Virginia

PHILADELPHIA - FEMA is proposing updates to the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) for Arlington County, Virginia. Community partners are invited to participate in a 90-day appeal and comment period.

The updated maps were produced in coordination with local, state and FEMA officials. Significant community review of the maps has already taken place, but before the maps become final, community partners can identify any corrections or questions about the information provided and submit appeals or comments.

The 90-day appeal period will begin on July 22, 2021. Residents, business owners and other community partners are encouraged to review the updated maps to learn about local flood risks and potential future flood insurance requirements. They may submit an appeal if they perceive that modeling or data used to create the map is technically or scientifically incorrect.

  • An appeal must include technical information, such as hydraulic or hydrologic data, to support the claim.
  • Appeals cannot be based on the effects of proposed projects or projects started after the study is in progress.
  • If property owners see incorrect information that does not change the flood hazard information—such as a missing or misspelled road name in the Special Flood Hazard Area or an incorrect corporate boundary—they can submit a written comment.

The next step in the mapping process is the resolution of all comments and appeals. Once they are resolved, FEMA will notify communities of the effective date of the final maps.

Submit appeals and comments by contacting your local floodplain administrator. For more information on floodplain management in Arlington County, visit https://environment.arlingtonva.us/flood-insurance-rate-maps/ or contact Aileen Winquist at awinquist@arlingtonva.us. The preliminary maps may be viewed online at the FEMA Flood Map Changes Viewer: http://msc.fema.gov/fmcv. Changes from the current maps may be viewed online at the Region 3 Changes Since Last FIRM Viewer: https://arcg.is/1LG0C4

For more information about the flood maps:

  • Use a live chat service about flood maps at http://go.usa.gov/r6C (just click on the “Live Chat” icon).
  • Contact a FEMA Map Specialist by telephone; toll free, at 1-877-FEMA-MAP (1-877-336-2627) or by email at FEMA-FMIX@fema.dhs.gov.

Most homeowner’s insurance policies do not cover flooding. There are cost-saving options available for those newly mapped into a high-risk flood zone. Learn more about your flood insurance options by talking with your insurance agent and visiting https://www.floodsmart.gov.

Arlington County Flood Mapping Milestones

  • April 6, 2020 — Flood Risk Review Meeting to review draft flood hazard data.
  • Sept. 18, 2020 — Preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map released.
  • Nov. 9, 2020 — Community Coordination and Outreach Meeting to review Preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map and discuss updates to local floodplain management ordinance and flood insurance.
  • July 22, 2021 –Appeal Period starts.
  • Fall 2022* — New Flood Insurance Rate Map becomes effective and flood insurance requirements take effect. (*Timeline subject to change pending completion of the appeal review process.)

If you have any questions, please contact FEMA Region 3 Office of External Affairs at (215) 931-5597 or at femar3newsdesk@fema.dhs.gov.

 

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FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

 

amanda.hancher Wed, 08/04/2021 - 14:05

Wed, 04 Aug 2021 14:05:31 +0000


Learn Disaster Risk Reduction Tips at Hammer Time True Value Hardware
Learn Disaster Risk Reduction Tips at Hammer Time True Value Hardware

CHICAGO - As southeast Michigan survivors clean and repair damage to their homes caused by the severe storms and flooding that occurred June 25-26, 2021, FEMA has teamed up with Hammer Time True Value Hardware in Detroit to provide free information, tips and literature on making homes and businesses stronger and safer.

The FEMA Hazard Mitigation team will be at:

Hammer Time True Value Hardware

16380 E Warren Avenue

Detroit, MI 48224

From: Aug. 2, 2021 to Aug. 14, 2021

Hours: Mon. through Sat. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. ET and Sun. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. ET

Most of the information and the free publications provided are geared to do-it-yourself work and general contractors. Recovery topics covered include clean-up tips, flood insurance, elevating utilities and rebuilding flooded homes.

FEMA Hazard Mitigation specialists are also on hand at Disaster Recovery Centers to answer questions and offer floodproofing information, home improvement tips and proven methods to prevent and lessen damage from future disasters. For more information about Michigan’s recovery, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4607. FEMA assistance is currently available to residents in Washtenaw and Wayne counties. The deadline for individuals to apply for disaster assistance is Sept. 13, 2021.                        

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Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency, or economic status. Reasonable accommodations, including translation and American Sign Language interpreters via Video Relay Service will be available to ensure effective communication with applicants with limited English proficiency, disabilities, and access and functional needs. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-3362 (including 711 or Video Relay). If you are deaf, hard of hearing or have a speech disability and use a TTY, call 800-462-7585.

FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

www.fema.gov/disaster/4607 https://twitter.com/femaregion5

troy.christensen Wed, 08/04/2021 - 13:05

Wed, 04 Aug 2021 13:05:44 +0000


FEMA Awards Lee County Electric Cooperative $27 Million for Hurricane Irma Expenses
FEMA Awards Lee County Electric Cooperative $27 Million for Hurricane Irma Expenses

ORLANDO, Fla. – FEMA has approved a grant of $27,075,628 for the State of Florida to help the Lee County Electric Cooperative (LCEC) defray the cost of repairs and equipment replacement for its utility distribution system after Hurricane Irma in 2017.

FEMA Public Assistance program funds will reimburse LCEC for extensive damage to its electrical transmission and distribution system including the replacement of 879 power meters, 1,107 concrete and wood poles, 376 streetlights and 659 transformers. In addition, the utility restored power to approximately 70 percent of its more than 200,000 customers in five Southwest Florida counties.  

The program provides grants to state, tribal and local governments, and certain types of private nonprofit organizations, including some houses of worship, so communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies. The Florida Division of Emergency Management works with FEMA during all phases of the program and conducts final reviews of FEMA-approved projects.

The federal share for Public Assistance projects is not less than 75 percent of the eligible cost. The state determines how the nonfederal share of the cost of a project (up to 25 percent) is split with subrecipients such as local and county governments.

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                   FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

 

Nadine.Jones Wed, 08/04/2021 - 12:38

Wed, 04 Aug 2021 12:38:15 +0000


Regional Airport Rehabilitation Is Underway with Million-dollar FEMA Allocation
Regional Airport Rehabilitation Is Underway with Million-dollar FEMA Allocation

GUAYNABO, Puerto Rico – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) awarded over $1.7 million for the repair of regional airports throughout the Island. The funds are destined for permanent repairs in the airports of Aguadilla, Ceiba, Culebra, Mayagüez and San Juan (Isla Grande).

According to the Puerto Rico Ports Authority, passenger activity between all regional airports-including those in Ponce and Humacao- reached over 1.2 million travelers between 2018 and 2019, prior to the start of the flight restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. In comparison, from 2020 to 2021, over 863,000 visitors have been registered.

“This network is an essential part of Puerto Rico’s tourism industry and is our first impression for many travelers visiting the island, for example, from Aguadilla International Airport. That is why it is important that these facilities are in peak condition and to be more competitive as a tourist destination,” said Puerto Rico Federal Disaster Recovery Coordinator, José G. Baquero.

The Agency allocated close to $164,00 to Rafael Hernández International Airport in Aguadilla for security work directed towards compliance with the Federal Aviation Administration Agency regulations, and close to $430,900 for the architectural and engineering studies that precedes construction and remodeling works.

Located on the previous facilities of the United States Airforce’s Ramey Airport, the regional airport of Aguadilla provides direct weekly flights in both directions to the Dominican Republic and the cities of Orlando, Fort Lauderdale, New York, Newark and Philadelphia. It is the regional airport with most passenger traffic, almost 130,000 people between 2020 and 2021, and has approximately 400 employees.

“Aguadilla’s Rafael Hernández International Airport is the second largest airport facility on the island in terms of passengers, with the longest runway in the Caribbean. FEMA funds allocated to this airport are extremely important for the safety of the thousands of passengers who use it and the hundreds of people who work here,” said José A. Riollano, director of the Ports Authority’s Aviation Bureau and airport manager.

Likewise, obligations approved for architectural and engineering studies at other regional airports include over $401,000 for the Fernando Ribas Dominicci Airport in Isla Grande, nearly $132,000 for the José Aponte de la Torre Airport in Ceiba, and over $88,000 for the Fernando Ribas Dominicci Regional Airport in Culebra.

On the other hand, $147,000 were approved for the Eugenio María de Hostos Airport in Mayagüez for works on the security of the perimeter that protect this important installation. Regional airports provide a network of air access that supports the local tourism industry between Mayagüez, Aguadilla, San Juan and the east coast of the island, including the island municipalities of Vieques and Culebra.

On his part, engineer Manuel A. Laboy Rivera, the Executive Director of the Central Office of Recovery, Reconstruction, and Resiliency (COR3), highlighted that infrastructure is the foundation for the economic development of Puerto Rico. “Currently, in COR3 we have disbursed approximately $4 million for these works and we will continue providing assistance in the formalities related associated with reconstruction through which the diverse economic sectors are strengthened”, Laboy Rivera added.

For more information on Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane María, please visit fema.gov/es/disaster/4339 and recuperacion.pr. Follow our social media pages at Facebook.com/FEMAPuertoRico, Facebook.com/COR3pr and Twitter @COR3pr.

 

frances.acevedo-pico Wed, 08/04/2021 - 11:27

Wed, 04 Aug 2021 11:27:32 +0000


FEMA and Territorial Partners Conduct Community Points of Distribution Exercises
FEMA and Territorial Partners Conduct Community Points of Distribution Exercises

ST. CROIX, U.S. Virgin IslandsLast month, FEMA led classroom and field exercises for the territory’s points of distribution managers and U.S. Virgin Islands logistics staff. FEMA’s Logistics staff could be used to monitor distribution sites for future events.

During the territory’s Hurricane Response Initiative and Capstone this past spring, it was clear that new points of distribution managers in the U.S. Virgin Islands needed to be recruited and trained.

“Coordination during this year’s Capstone workshops between FEMA and our partners in the U.S. Virgin Islands led to Community Points of Distribution training last month. Points of distribution managers now have the ability to organize and distribute commodities to support Virgin Islanders for their greatest time of need,” said Mark A. Walters, Coordinator for FEMA’s U.S. Virgin Islands Caribbean Area Office. “Even as we work together improve our ability to respond to disasters, it is still very important for Virgin Islanders to prepare themselves and their families with at least 10 days of food, water and medicines to survive until Community Points of Distribution can be established.”  

Coordinated distribution of food, water, tarps, and blankets is critical to reduce human suffering and provide life-sustaining commodities for disaster survivors. Disasters including hurricanes and earthquakes often disrupt supply chains, close retail stores, and fill ports and roads with debris making access to food, water and other important supplies challenging.

The path to standing up Community Points of Distribution begins long before the onset of disasters. The responders who lead these critical operations must be trained and ready to help survivors when the moment arrives.

Region 2’s Incident Management Assistance Team supported the training for points of distribution managers at the request of the Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency and the Virgin Islands Department of Human Services. The Virgin Islands National Guard provided personnel and vehicles for the field exercises.

“It is crucial for the U.S. Virgin Islands, and especially the Virgin Islands Department of Human Services to obtain the most up-to-date training in all areas of disaster preparedness and readiness, including the Community Points of Distribution,” said Kimberley Causey-Gomez, Commissioner of the Department of Human Services. “We are truly thankful for our federal and local partners, FEMA and VITEMA and other local Emergency Support Function 6 support agencies to ensure effective outcomes for all types and sizes of threats and hazards, thereby improving resiliency locally. Enhancing public trust in our responsiveness before, during and post disaster is also important. We encourage our community to be diligent in preparing themselves and continuing to stay safe during all hazards,” said Causey-Gomez.

The Virgin Islands Voluntary/Community Organizations Active in Disasters participated in the points of distribution training as well. A combined 56 students attended the training at St. Croix Educational Complex, Bertha C. Boschulte Middle School on St. Thomas and located at St. John Rescue.  

“Having trained individuals in the community with knowledge on how to properly manage a community distribution point is essential. These sites become a key location for distributing food and water and keeping calm in our community following a natural disaster, such as a hurricane,” said Daryl Jaschen, Director of VITEMA. “I am extremely pleased with the number of volunteers willing to participate and work together with VITEMA, National Guard, Department of Health, and FEMA to support such an endeavor, if ever the need arises,” said Jaschen.   

Even as FEMA and the GVI work to improve their ability respond to disasters, Virgin Islanders should prepare to be self-sufficient in the immediate aftermath of a hurricane and take steps to protect their property. Those with disabilities and others with access and functional needs may have additional considerations. Find more ways to prepare at http://vitema.vi.gov/ready/build-a-kit .

Daryl Jaschen, Director of the Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency, (center), meets with members of Region 2's Incident Management Assistance Team, FEMA U.S. Virgin Islands logistics staff and partners from the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Human Services and Love City Strong during a Community Points of Distribution field exercise in Gifft Hill.

St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, July 19, 2021 -- Daryl Jaschen, Director of the Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency, (center), meets with members of Region 2's Incident Management Assistance Team, FEMA U.S. Virgin Islands logistics staff and partners from the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Human Services and Love City Strong during a Community Points of Distribution field exercise in Gifft Hill. FEMA/Geri Purvis

Members of Region 2's Incident Management Assistance Team, FEMA Virgin Islands logistics staff and territorial partners from the Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency and U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Human Services conduct a Community Points of Distribution field exercise at Educational Complex.

St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, July 13, 2021 – Members of Region 2's Incident Management Assistance Team, FEMA Virgin Islands logistics staff and territorial partners from the Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency and U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Human Services conduct a Community Points of Distribution field exercise at Educational Complex. FEMA/Geri Purvis

Members of Region 2's Incident Management Assistance Team lead a class on Community Points of Distribution for FEMA's U.S. Virgin Islands logistics staff and territorial partners from the Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Human Services at Bertha C. Boschulte Middle School.

St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, July 15, 2021 -- Members of Region 2's Incident Management Assistance Team lead a class on Community Points of Distribution for FEMA's U.S. Virgin Islands logistics staff and territorial partners from the Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Human Services at Bertha C. Boschulte Middle School. FEMA/Geri Purvis

gina.callaghan Tue, 08/03/2021 - 19:00

Tue, 03 Aug 2021 19:00:59 +0000


FEMA Extends Emergency Non-Congregate Sheltering Assistance for Displaced Disaster Survivors
FEMA Extends Emergency Non-Congregate Sheltering Assistance for Displaced Disaster Survivors

WASHINGTON -- FEMA has extended funding for Emergency Non-Congregate Sheltering during the COVID-19 public health emergency until Nov. 30, 2021, as the agency continues to help protect people during their recovery from hurricanes and wildfires. Under this policy, FEMA reimburses state, tribal and territorial governments partial cost of providing non-congregate sheltering for people who must evacuate during a disaster.

Typically, displaced disaster survivors are sheltered in facilities with large open spaces, such as schools, churches, community centers or similar facilities, rather than in non-congregate environments, which are locations where each individual or household has living space that offers some level of privacy such as hotels, motels or dormitories.

We have made significant progress over the past six months in our fight against COVID-19. To date,164 million Americans are fully vaccinated, including 80% of seniors and more than 60% of all adults. But the Delta variant is different. It’s more contagious, with the variant spreading more than twice as easily from one person to another.

FEMA recognizes sheltering operations during the COVID-19 public health emergency may require states, tribes and territories to consider additional strategies to ensure survivors are sheltered in a manner that does not increase the risk of exposure to or further transmit the disease. After a Stafford Act declaration, states, tribes and territories may be eligible for reimbursement of costs associated with non-congregate sheltering.

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, FEMA established a policy that allowed state, local, tribal and territorial governments to apply for reimbursement of costs associated with non-congregate sheltering of disaster survivors under FEMA’s Public Assistance program. Originally scheduled to end on Dec. 31, 2020, the policy was extended until July 31, 2021. Due to the continuing need to protect public safety during the COVID-19 pandemic, FEMA has further extended this policy until Nov. 30, 2021.

FEMA has extended the policy once again to ensure that survivors unable to return home can be safely sheltered after a disaster. Anyone interested in receiving the COVID-19 vaccine should visit vaccines.gov to find a location close to them and make an appointment. Individuals can also text their zip code to 438829 to receive a text with the closest COVID-19 vaccine location.

mayshaunt.gary Tue, 08/03/2021 - 13:53

Tue, 03 Aug 2021 13:53:53 +0000


FEMA Awards Florida Keys Electric Cooperative $2.17 Million to Protect Transmission Poles
FEMA Awards Florida Keys Electric Cooperative $2.17 Million to Protect Transmission Poles

ORLANDO, Fla. – FEMA has approved a grant of $2,174,276 for the Florida Keys Electric Cooperative (FKEC) to upgrade 82 electrical transmission poles to protect them from high wind damage and substantially reduce the vulnerability of the utility’s electrical distribution system to future storms.

Funding from FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) was approved in response to a proposal by FKEC after Hurricane Irma in 2017. The grant will help pay for the conversion to stronger, stand-alone poles that can withstand winds of up to 210 miles per hour and provide natural corrosion resistance.

The HMGP is an important source of federal disaster assistance. Program funding may become available after the president declares a major disaster, with a goal of strengthening communities by improving buildings and critical infrastructure. A 2018 report by the National Institute of Building Sciences found that one dollar spent on hazard mitigation saves more than six dollars of recovery and rebuilding costs.

Generally, the HMGP may provide a state, tribe or territory with additional grants up to 15 percent of the total disaster grants awarded by FEMA for a federally declared disaster. States such as Florida that meet advanced mitigation planning criteria may qualify for a higher percentage.

Florida has a FEMA-approved Enhanced Mitigation Plan, making the state eligible for HMGP funding not to exceed 20 percent of the estimated total amount of grant money spent by FEMA in the Hurricane Irma disaster. From this amount, the HMGP reimburses the state up to 75 percent of eligible costs for hazard mitigation projects. The remaining amount comes from other sources such as state and local assets and a combination of cash and in-kind sources.

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                 FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.

 

Nadine.Jones Tue, 08/03/2021 - 12:34

Tue, 03 Aug 2021 12:34:26 +0000


FEMA Awards Funding to Wyoming for Post-Fire Mitigation
FEMA Awards Funding to Wyoming for Post-Fire Mitigation

DENVER – FEMA recently awarded more than $400,000 to Albany and Carbon counties for post-fire mitigation. The funds are related to FEMA’s approval of a Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) request from the state of Wyoming for the Mullen Fire. The Mullen Fire started on Sept. 17, 2020, and burned more than 176,800 acres.

As a part of the FMAG award, funding is made available through FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post-Fire assistance for hazard mitigation measures that substantially reduce the risk of future damage, hardship, loss, or suffering. Albany County received a federal cost share of $352,500, and Carbon County received $77,625. The program has a maximum 75 percent federal cost share, with the remaining costs the responsibility of the state and the applicant. The funding covers a variety of hazard mitigation measures including replanting grass and vegetation, erosion control, tree removal, soil stabilization, and mulching.

For more information about FEMA’s HMGP Post-Fire program, visit https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire

jamie.casterton Mon, 08/02/2021 - 21:15

Mon, 02 Aug 2021 21:15:53 +0000


FEMA COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Tops $888 Million
FEMA COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Tops $888 Million

WASHINGTON -- FEMA has provided over $888 million to more than 135,000 people to assist with COVID-19-related funeral costs for deaths occurring on or after Jan. 20, 2020.

Eligibility determinations are not driven by state/location; instead, they are based on when the applicant submits all required documentation.

“Applications” in the below chart reflect the number of individuals who called to begin the assistance process.

Please find state-specific information below:

State/Territory

Applications

Amount Approved

Number of Awards

ALABAMA

5,562

$20,875,004

3,022

ALASKA

125

$307,329

55

AMERICAN SAMOA

Less than 10

$0

0

ARIZONA

4,230

$11,647,696

2,291

ARKANSAS

2,432

$9,210,111

1,448

CALIFORNIA

26,290

$83,433,610

12,851

COLORADO

1,901

$5,566,742

978

COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANAS

Less than 10

$4,344

Less than 10

CONNECTICUT

3,053

$12,859,055

1,835

DELAWARE

776

$2,506,199

394

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

489

$1,473,933

216

FLORIDA

14,176

$41,577,352

7,342

GEORGIA

9,310

$35,154,735

5,047

GUAM

13

$32,707

Less than 10

HAWAII

240

$737,790

126

IDAHO

514

$1,422,913

245

ILLINOIS

10,559

$40,584,290

5,919

INDIANA

4,394

$17,373,805

2,470

IOWA

2,215

$9,493,523

1,320

KANSAS

2,069

$7,313,221

1,103

KENTUCKY

3,318

$13,815,322

1,942

LOUISIANA

4,559

$16,341,602

2,384

MAINE

333

$824,021

152

MARYLAND

4,960

$18,081,381

2,681

MASSACHUSETTS

5,077

$20,546,999

2,941

MICHIGAN

8,492

$29,880,195

4,902

MINNESOTA

2,439

$10,867,337

1,566

MISSISSIPPI

3,994

$14,644,715

2,163

MISSOURI

4,386

$17,317,385

2,737

MONTANA

441

$978,218

195

NEBRASKA

1,063

$4,637,152

651

NEVADA

2,117

$5,748,725

1,037

NEW HAMPSHIRE

606

$2,024,960

342

NEW JERSEY

10,613

$40,261,837

5,798

NEW MEXICO

1,369

$3,178,052

623

NEW YORK

23,136

$78,463,913

11,306

NORTH CAROLINA

7,384

$28,099,342

4,234

NORTH DAKOTA

611

$2,498,601

331

OHIO

8,574

$32,897,260

5,103

OKLAHOMA

3,468

$14,079,585

2,185

OREGON

748

$1,866,649

350

PENNSYLVANIA

11,442

$44,492,137

6,782

PUERTO RICO

1,044

$1,561,354

447

RHODE ISLAND

1,035

$3,422,949

492

SOUTH CAROLINA

5,088

$20,898,631

3,024

SOUTH DAKOTA

654

$2,593,144

349

TENNESSEE

6,085

$24,007,882

3,467

TEXAS

22,413

$82,188,963

12,585

U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

23

$65,749

10

UTAH

946

$3,877,342

554

VERMONT

125

$399,388

66

VIRGINIA

5,429

$20,838,650

3,123

WASHINGTON

1,636

$4,155,541

749

WEST VIRGINIA

1,315

$4,369,649

640

WISCONSIN

3,989

$16,070,898

2,431

WYOMING

221

$746,083

131

* Funeral assistance data can/will change daily; the information reflects data as of 8 a.m. today.

Applicants may apply by calling 844-684-6333 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday. Multilingual services are available. Please note, phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number. Applicants who use a relay service, such as a videophone, Innocaption or CapTel, should provide FEMA with the specific number assigned to them for that service so that agency representatives are able to contact them.

Additional information about COVID-19 funeral assistance, including frequently asked questions, is available on FEMA.gov.

mayshaunt.gary Mon, 08/02/2021 - 20:48

Mon, 02 Aug 2021 20:48:58 +0000


FEMA Provides an Additional $23.4 Million to the City and County of Denver for COVID-19 Response
FEMA Provides an Additional $23.4 Million to the City and County of Denver for COVID-19 Response

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has provided $23.4 million in additional Public Assistance funding for the COVID-19 response to the City and County of Denver. The assistance was made available under a major disaster declaration issued March 28, 2020. FEMA has provided a total of $131 million for Denver’s COVID-19 response to date, and $951 million statewide.

The funding was provided to the City and County of Denver for establishing and operating emergency shelters in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Emergency sheltering services were provided to vulnerable members of the community needing isolation and quarantine. Such services include, but are not limited to, the following: facility leasing; staffing and support services; medical services; wraparound services; force account labor and supplies. This follows a previous award of $60.5 million, bringing the federal support for Denver’s vaccination mission to $83.9 million.

This funding is authorized under the January 21, 2021, Presidential Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense & the Secretary of Homeland Security and Section 403 of the Robert T. Stafford Act.

For the COVID-19 response, FEMA has simplified the Public Assistance application and funding process to address the magnitude of this event and to allow local officials to receive eligible funding more quickly. These reimbursements play a critical role as state, local and tribal officials work tirelessly to assist their communities during this response.

Additional information about FEMA’s Public Assistance program can be found at www.fema.gov/assistance/public.

 

anthony.mayne Mon, 08/02/2021 - 17:04

Mon, 02 Aug 2021 17:04:45 +0000